Baby Rhymes

Stories Of Little Prince

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★ Stories Of Little Prince Story :

In The Little Prince, its narrator, the pilot, talks of being stranded in the desert beside his crashed aircraft. The account clearly drew on Saint-Exupéry’s own experience in the Sahara, an ordeal described in detail in his 1939 memoir Wind, Sand and Stars (original French: Terre des hommes).

On 30 December 1935, at 02:45 am, after 19 hours and 44 minutes in the air, Saint-Exupéry, along with his copilot-navigator André Prévot, crashed in the Sahara desert.[23] They were attempting to break the speed record for a Paris-to-Saigon flight in a then-popular type of air race called a raid, that had a prize of 150,000 francs. Their plane was a Caudron C-630 Simoun,[Note 3] and the crash site is thought to have been near to the Wadi Natrun valley, close to the Nile Delta.

Both miraculously survived the crash, only to face rapid dehydration in the intense desert heat.[26] Their maps were primitive and ambiguous. Lost among the sand dunes with a few grapes, a thermos of coffee, a single orange, and some wine, the pair had only one day’s worth of liquid. They both began to see mirages, which were quickly followed by more vivid hallucinations. By the second and third days, they were so dehydrated that they stopped sweating altogether. Finally, on the fourth day, a Bedouin on a camel discovered them and administered a native rehydration treatment, which saved Saint-Exupéry’s and Prévot’s lives.

The prince’s home, “Asteroid B-612”, was likely derived as a progression of one of the planes Saint-Exupéry flew as an airmail pilot, which bore the serial number “A-612”. During his service as a mail pilot in the Sahara, Saint-Exupéry had viewed a fennec (desert sand fox), which most likely inspired him to create the fox character in the book. In a letter written to his sister Didi from the Western Sahara’s Cape Juby, where he was the manager of an airmail stopover station in 1928, he tells of raising a fennec that he adored.

In the novella, the fox, believed to be modeled after the author’s intimate New York City friend, Silvia Hamilton Reinhardt, tells the prince that his rose is unique and special, as she is the one he loves.[27] The novella’s iconic phrase, “One sees clearly only with the heart” is believed to have been suggested by Reinhardt.

The fearsome, grasping baobab trees, researchers have contended, were meant to represent Nazism attempting to destroy the planet. The little prince’s reassurance to the pilot that the prince’s body is only an empty shell resembles the last words of Antoine’s dying younger brother François, who told the author, from his deathbed: “Don’t worry. I’m all right. I can’t help it. It’s my body”.

★ Checkout this Story aswell :
Fox And The Frog Prince

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